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the deficit and immigration and gun safety and i don't think he's going to be very frustrated if washington is completely divorced from the reality in the country so he's going to seek common ground. he's going to find every way to compromise but he's going to be pretty clear and we're also going to bring the american people more into the debate than the first term. >> what's the big difference in the president obama that took the oath four years ago and tomorrow. >> there's atmospheric differences. we had an economy collapsing all around us and he was a first term president and still putting together his team and agenda and cabinet and still the economy is too weak but recovering and the question is right now building on that as opposed to simply trying to stem the bleeding. big difference and i think the experience of the office as you know. you know, that helps a lot and so i think he does have even more sure-footedness in his approach. >> it can become a bit of a burden. historians write about the second term curse and i know you and your team spent a lot of time studying how to avoid t
. this would give the right signals on energy sources and use. it could raise money to reduce the deficit, restore our infrastructure, speed and finance conservation. there are a number of other commonsense steps that would make progress on carbon pollution and energy conservation goals more significant. the epa should stop dragging its feet permitting old coal plants to continue to spew forth toxic waste, harming the environment and the health of our citizens. it is past time the clean air act reinforced. make sure there are proper safeguards for the cracking technology. make sure this reservoir of inexpensive gas does not undercut the addition of renewables to our energy portfolio. solar, wind, geothermal. dership on these technologies for a balanced energy portfolio and ultimately to reduce our carbon footprint. at each step, we should be looking to enhance energy conservation, because the cheapest kilowatt hour is one that you don't have to generate. we should have a 10-year glide path in support of renewable energy. the wind energy industry has already signaled its reaccept tift just
about the deficit implication. allegedly these guys are saying they want to try to help our debt situation. the debt held by the public is about $10 trillion. that makes the math kind of easy. if we lurch from crisis like this every couple of months, at some point our creditors, the folks who lend ution money, are going to insist on an interest rate premium. suppose it goes up 0.1%, ten basis points. that is equivalent to $10 billion more of debt obligations, and the last time we even bellied up to this debt ceiling debate according to the bipartisan policy center, it cost us about $19 billion over ten years because of the very interest rate affect i'm defining. this is a manufactured crisis mentality with the goal of disparaging government and slashing the heck out of social insurance and spending. make no mistakes about it. >> to jared's point, it does nothing to the deficit. >> it makes it worse. >> it makes it worse. >> paul ryan has never been interested in deficit reduction. if you look at the ryan -- >> hang on a second. i just listened to him as the vice presidential cand
or the highway either. we have a huge spending deficit problem. they were considering for well over a week the notion of just mint inging a trillion dollar c and calling it good. the federal reserve said that's phony. that doesn't work. and the treasury department on saturday said okay, you are right. we won't go that route. we need serious proposals from the president and it is not just the congress. it is -- we got to work together to solve the country's problems. >> let me -- let me split off debt limit here. are you willing to do the debt limit on its own without any -- president say he's not going to negotiate, are you willing to pass a clean debt limit? >> you know, i think passing a clean debt limit is problematic for the american people as well as for the congress and the country. i think that we should find common ground here to look at spending reforms for the long term to gettous a path to reducing debt and deficit. i think we should look at current spending reductions that could take place and in ways we can grow the economy. i would like to see us work together on this matter
to get the deficit down. we're going to do a budget this year and it will have revenues in it and our republican colleagues better get used to that fact. martha: promise, promises right? they will do a budget this year. we haven't seen one in how long? stuart varney the anchor of "varney & company". how many years has it been now? >> i believe it is 3 1/2 years. we go through the tax debate. we thought we got higher taxes on the rich and it was over, not so. senator schumer and fellow democrats are proposing yet higher taxes on the rich, more taxes on oil and gas companies and taxes on profits that american corporations makeover seas. so that is three big areas where taxes are going to go up. all of this we are told is going to be in the new budget which the senate has to pass in about a three-month period. so, here they come, higher taxes. martha: yeah. i mean, stuart, as you point out the argument that is being waged now about really tax rerecall follow was something that conservatives offered the first time around as a good way to sort of change the system and bring in more revenue
everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about another part of the speech where he said, quote: our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are tweeted like anyone else under the law. what's significant about this it's the first time any u.s. president has used the word gay in an inaugural address. you will remember it was only a few months ago the president came out in favor of same sex marriage. that was a change for him. he now is making clear that gay rights will also be part of his second term agenda, shep. >> shepard: what are we getting in the way of reaction to this speech, ed? >> well, look, republicans are going to be a little bi
make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause] we remember the lessons of our past, years spent in poverty, the parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the few. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us, at any time, may face a job loss or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments that we make to each other through medicare, medicaid, social security, they do not sapped our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers, they free us to take risks to make this country great. host: the top republican in the senate responded to the president's address saying that he congratulated the president on his inauguration and that he wished him well in his duty to lead the u.s. at home and a
reforms for the long term that get us on a path to reducing debt and deficit. the issue is can't we get the president to sit down with us and not tell us it's our way or the highway or his way or the highway? that doesn't produce the kind of collaborative response to a problem. >> so i don't know whose highway specifically he wants to be on here but the bottom line is congressman walden sees at least from his vantage point that the debt limit should be tied to spending cuts and that's the road he'd like to pursue. where are things right now? >> well, here's where things are right now and the president's been very clear. the president's willing to negotiate a way to reduce the debt through a combination of cuts, but also, through tax reform. but what he's not willing to negotiate and he should not noer negotiate is over whether the congress pays for the bills. the congress is saying if we don't make the changes the way they want to, they're threatening to tank the united states economy. again, the debt ceiling, it is really important that people understand, this is not about expanding yo
it was in '93 and we were talking about an omnibus spending bill. it was a deficit reduction bill but of course it was called the tax increase. and there were things in the bill that i liked and there were things in the bill i didn't like. i didn't think it went far enough with regard to deficit reduction. i didn't think it went far enough with regard to entitlements. so i was a no vote, and i walked into the house that night and the republicans were high-fiving saying they don't have the votes and the democrats were figuring out how they could switch their votes and i said wait a minute, we came in with this president in '92, it was the largest class of women, there were 21 new women, 24 democrats. and the president was on the phone, and he said what would it take? and i said a serious discussion about entitlements, further cuts, and i'll only be your last vote because there had only been two -- in the house as you know, a tie vote goes down. >> sure. >> so i said i'd only be your 218th vote and there had been two votes i knew like this in history. one for the impeachment of andrew johnson and
, the deficit, gun control, immigration. what should the president do first to show republicans he's not looking for revenge or looking to pick fights? >> i would say the budget. to make an honest attempt on both sides to try to reduce spending or reduce the growth in spending. that to me is the one place where there is enough on the table that both sides can make progress if they want to. you get into gun control, i basically support the president's program, but he's not going to get very much support at all among republicans for that. that's a good political point for him, but i don't see it going anywhere. as far as the illegal immigration or making it legal or whatever, reform, i would say there's an opportunity, people like marco rubio, for instance, and others, and also you have the chamber of commerce, you have some republican vested interest. i would say the budget and immigration are the two areas, spending and immigration. >> can he get through some simple things on gun control, if not a ban on assault weapons. that might be impossible with republican caucus, but universal background c
a budget deficit a few years ago, we have a surplus and giving them the authority to do things without as much federal interference as we had in the past will be great. we'll see if that happens. the president has talked about flexibility before and now is the time to make it it happen and he's got willing partners at the state level. if he's willing to help give us that kind of flexibility. >> you said he talked about flexibility before. have you actually seen it and asked for it? >> we have not. it's been asked for not only for governors, but the national governor's association, talking about a need for that. particularly we know there's a difference between republicans controlling the house and democrats controlling the presidency as well as the united states senate and if they ultimately want to get things done, one of the best ways to get things done on behalf the american people is to give that kind of authority back to the governors at the state levels. you've got a good mix of republican and democratic governors out there. part of it is not just about medicaid and spending, it'
they should have been showing it off. if they're so into cutting the deficit and they think spend issing the problem, show it off. let's see what you got. they don't want to do it. >> what i don't understand about this is why if you believe that ultimately they're going to have to cave, why don't we just let them cave? why do we need to create all of these other sort of -- as i said wack-a-do arrangements so this can happen? >> it's all leverage, right? if the sequester, that deal is not great for the republicans or that battle is not great for them because that disproportionately hurts republican industries, which is to say the defense industry, which is not to say that there aren't plenty of democrats whose bread is not being buttered by defense contractors, but if you look down at the breakdown of sequester cuts, defense gets hit with $55 billion in cuts, but they are much more severe, and as dave wood from the huffington post has said, it's like taking a meat clever to the defense industry. the nondefense cuts, 55 billion, same amount, but social security, retirement, veterans medica
question at the top, economy in general at 21%, goes down to the federal budget deficit, dissatisfaction with government, unemployment, taxes, all the way at the bottom is gun. >> the web video which targets basically the president's children, who have secret service protection, as all children of presidents. over the line? >> based on this poll, he should have been apologizing for those children to breaking their piggy banks to pay for the national debt. that's what americans are concerned about. >> i'm asking you about the web video. >> because his children -- >> which children? >> children he had there on display, because his children, his own children, are well protected. joe biden opened up by saying that schools should be a sanctuary. well, he must have this confused, because the president's girls do go to a sanctuary, well-armed there, but most american kids are not protected at all. >> you don't think the president's children should be off limits? >> i think she should be protected and i think our children should be. i have seven school-aged children. i would hope and pray there
it himself. what i'm told is that we can expect to touch as you might expect on deficits and debt. on immigration and gun control. but he is also going to address our seemingly broken politics. you have to remember the inaugural address is part of a large day of events and the people who are organizing it well placed democrats tell me that they are trying to make sure that one appeared, including the president. no one appears to be spiking the football. they don't want people watching at home as one democrat said to me to get the idea that oh, he, meaning the president, is having a big party while the rest of us are still mired in a financial crisis, bill. >> bill: yeah. they are even having trouble filling the party. the address is monday night. we will be live on the factor. we have a really good lineup. i have seen a change in the demeanor as i said to senator rubio of president obama. is he a little more in your face than he was before the election. just real quick, rosen, you have seen that change? >> yeah. and i think the nomination of chuck hagel shows it. >> bill: okay. no
of the great issues that the country is facing. >> right. >> sequestration and budget deficits and all of the rest. >> now, these decisions by loips of both parties over the years of who has been running it to shorten the weeks, it's all been about, well, it gives you time to go home, to be in touch with your constituents. that is the feeling. do you think it is too much time being given to campaigning? that is your argument? >> well, that is the rationale. that is what the public is told. the fact is money has become toxic in politics. that is the other big change. i mean, we're told here two things. one is the one with the most money gets the most votes and, number two, you should be spending 30 hours a week in fund raising and call time dialing for dollars. >> let me stop you there. you're told to spend -- this is on your side they want you to spend 30 hours a week making phone calls for raising money? >> yes. for money. and, you know, i'm not going to do that. i haven't done that. i'm here to govern. but the fact is my last election contest years ago i think i spent like $250,000.
make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. >> some republicans are complaining now that the president's speech was too partisan and didn't reach out enough. here is a news flash. this isn't about those republican lawmakers. this is about you, the american people and the policies that the president has put forth. it's about fixing the budget without burdening the poor in this country or the elderly or the disabled. the next four years are going to be very interesting. let's turn to john nichols, washington correspondent of "the nation" magazine. and john, "the nation" magazine was so impressed with the speech today that there was a lot of rewriting going on. >> yep. and i sometimes have to do a lot of that rewriting. >> remarkably progressive today? >> yeah, it was. we were struck by it. we set a high standard for this president. we don't let him off the hook when we disagree
means of controlling deficits, and a danger to this country's standing in the world financial markets. >> we must not permit and artificial debt ceiling to throw the country into default and our economy into chaos and depression, which is exactly what the republicans are threatening to do. jon: some conservative groups warn that removing the limit is a recipe for economic disaster, as we're seeing now in greece. the leaders of heritage action family research council and club for growth writing in an op ed they want congress to balance the budget within ten years and keep it balanced. quote, no american should have to tell an eight-year-old child that we cannot get our nation's house in order by the time she goes to college. there are many ways to get to a d republicans haved both an obligation to explain what path they will choose. jonah goldberg is editor at large for national review online, he's also a fox news contributor. get rid of the debt ceiling all together? jonah, what do you think about that idea? >> well i don't think it's a disaster if we got rid of the debt ceiling but i
piecemeal. social security has nothing to do with the deficit, and it ought to be dealt with as a separate issue, but it has a lot to do with settling issues in the economy, because social security is a wedge issue if you don't get it fixed. so, let's fix social security and keep it where it ought to be walled off from everything else, and then take a hard look at how the tackle the things when it comes to the medicare and medicaid. >> so there's a sense of unlinking it from the sort of time-pressed issues that are about the debt ceiling and that sort of thing, because this is not really on that topic. >> it is not on that at all and we should de-link it in all of the discussions, and i do belief that the atmosphere is there for us to do so. >> congressman clyburn, i so appreciate your taking the time and it is nice to be in washington to speak with you. >> thank you so much for being with us. you are bringing a little sunlight. i want to tell your viewers what i saw out here before i got on here. >> the dancing that i do before the show. it does happen. up next, the insiders' guide to the
of the lines of the deficit and the mention of newtown and other issues, but notably on immigration reform, he just sort of sat there while other members did applaud. whether or not you can read something into that, i am not sure, but it is definitely an opportunity for reaction on the other side. host: to all of these issues we have been addressing the last hour, i want to look at something your colleague wrote in "the washington post." "if the president can reach a broad deal that settles some of the disputes over entitlement spending and tax code and govgiving the government borrowing authority to last through much of the term, he can use that energy to forge a bipartisan, rise on these other big issues to." guest: that is a huge point. one point that ms. mcconnell, republican leader in the senate, has made over and over again is the reason they are using to get them as leverage is they feel the urgency of the issue, and one of the things he said in the past few weeks was that if obama does come to the table and helps to craft a big deal, both sides can agree to, he will be able to move on
a fifth year in a row where we are going to have a deficit exceeding a trillion dollars a year. that's the greatest threat to the middle class in america and we are committed to trying to address that problem. that's one of the reasons why i voted against the fiscal cliff deal. the president called for a balanced approach. i think his approach raising taxes is not the way to grow our economy. nonetheless, he indicated there would be spending cuts. there were not. in fact there were spending increases in that bill. host: fix boxer's original assault gun ban. echoing a recent poll that said 30% of those polled are dissatisfied with gun laws, want to see them strengthened. not specific gun laws but, you know, saying we need to reinstitute the assault weapons ban and fix it. guest: well, the evidence -- again, we are certainly willing to listen to proposals that are offered by the president and his commission and by others, but the original assault weapons ban was not a meaningful law because it did not distinguish between the so-called assault weapon and other types of firearms that fir
, and it is this. the huge budget arguments about to take place, the huge deficit spending stuff, the huge we're going to face it again, you know, debt ceiling stuff, what is the republican strategy in dealing with the democrats? david. >> you know, mike, i was on capitol hill this week talking to top republicans, and i'm getting a sense and you're seeing it written about as well, that they would maybe like to step away from the brink about the debt ceiling. they do want to force the issue about how can they get this president to agree to additional spending cuts? the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. i think they recognize that politically. they'll push -- the question is how -- how do they push on the debt ceiling? do they say, look, we'll give you a short-term extension of the debt ceiling for a certain amount of spending cuts, or we'll give you a long-term extension like you want for even more spending cuts. can they force entitlement reform around medicare, for instance, even some of the -- in their view -- more limited things that the president wants to do around means testing and age a
to handle on the state level. how do we do it? >> we've nearly closed our structural deficit in maryland. it's because of job creation. we've recovered now, thanks to president obama's tough but right decisions, we've recovered 80% of what we lost in the bush recession. you talk about the hyperinflation and medicare medicaid, that's what the affordable care act was about. that's why the president did that. >> but first of all, we're not going to be able to grow out of our problems that we're facing with medicare and medicaid. we're just not. the numbers show that -- >> you agree with that right? >> wait a minute. that cbo also says though that even the affordable care act is not going to stop the ticking demographic time bomb. >> but the common platform that we now have with the affordable care act, if the states step up allows us to bend down that cost curve so we can invest in education, can invest in making college more affordable, can invest -- >> i have to ask you this question because people have said you're talking about possibly thinking about running four
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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